Lowes Employment Job Search and 10 Interview Mistakes

The interview panel was made up of two store managers and a department manager (the role we were applying for) from one of the recruiting stores. We were then split into groups of three and asked to go onto the shopfloor and select a product.

To determine how an applicant would handle relationships, again ask questions about specific scenarios, such as a how a security manager would influence an employee to change to more security-friendly ways. I then worked as a junior computer tech in my last 2 summers of high school. Here, your interviewer is determining if you are:

Management interview questions These examples of manager interview questions can help you identify the best candidates for senior level positions. Use the most suitable management interview questions to assess candidates’ team-leading skills in these important roles.
Answering confidently is the key to winning a department manager post. Go to mock questions and rehearse the answers to the questions listed there. That will help you prepare for your upcoming interview. Print all Department Manager Interview Questions.
Dec 22,  · From the part time cashier, to the lumber expert, appliance salesperson, department manager, store manager and district manager. Lowes wants the best people in every position. In order for you to get hired however, you need to have a flawless interview.4/5.
The following sample job interview questions about management and supervisory skills enable you to assess your candidate’s skills in management and supervision. Feel free to use these job interview questions in your own candidate interviews. Or, use them as a base to develop your own.
The following sample job interview questions about management and supervisory skills enable you to assess your candidate’s skills in management and supervision. Feel free to use these job interview questions in your own candidate interviews. Or, use them as a base to develop your own.

The interview panel was made up of two store managers and a department manager (the role we were applying for) from one of the recruiting stores. We were then split into groups of three and asked to go onto the shopfloor and select a product.

Ask questions that will show whether the candidate for the security department manager position has a grasp of the big picture -- for example, ask the candidate about what the primary challenges in security are today and what the most important quality for a security director is. Include at least one theoretical example in the interview. For example, ask what measures the applicant would take in the case of a visiting dignitary. Or, ask how the security director would handle a suspected case of embezzlement, or how the security director would respond to a confirmed case of theft, including any discussions with the media.

The answers to these kinds of questions will indicate whether candidates have broad knowledge, can think quickly and know best practices upon which they can draw upon. Ask potential security department managers questions relating to managing staff. Trust and positive interpersonal relationships are vital for a security director. Ask candidates how they would handle personnel issues such as scheduling, establishing relationships with law enforcement and reporting to superiors.

To determine how an applicant would handle relationships, again ask questions about specific scenarios, such as a how a security manager would influence an employee to change to more security-friendly ways.

Ask candidates to explain how they will help the company stay in compliance with laws and regulations and ensure the company suffers no problems. Candidates must be able to converse about basic physical and information technology security such as compliance, Sarbanes-Oxley and SAS Her work has been published in the "American Fork Citizen" and "Cincinnati Enquirer" as well as on corporate websites and in other online publications.

Company Practices and Culture Ask security department managers how their past experiences will help your company, and what role the security department plays in the management structure. Vision Include questions about the vision the candidate has for the security department.

Video of the Day. Brought to you by Sapling. Specific Situations Include at least one theoretical example in the interview. Relationships Ask potential security department managers questions relating to managing staff. Compliance Knowledge Ask candidates to explain how they will help the company stay in compliance with laws and regulations and ensure the company suffers no problems.

As a retail department manager, what is your management style? Try to avoid labels. Some of the more common labels, like progressive, consultative, persuasive, can have several meanings or descriptions depending on which management guru you listen to. The situational style is safe, because it says you will manage according to the situation, instead of one size fits all. Answer samples In my experience delegating responsibility and authority is crucial. A team needs to be able to develop and grow as individuals and a whole, not be held back by low expectations or ego.

I believe in building a team. Each member of the team should be clear on their role, know where they fit in and feel as though they can depend on one another. I also believe in real-time feedback. If you do something wrong you should know it immediately. Regardless of right or wrong, the further removed feedback is in time, the less effective it is.

Speak about specifics that relate to the position you are applying for. If you know you do not have much experience in the job you are applying for, plan for this question ahead of time and ensure you can provide some relatable examples based on what you have done. Almost all interviewers will appreciate confidence and pride in the work experience you have earned and your passion in transfering these valuable skills to your future role or position. Back then, it was obviously about earning some spending money.

I then worked as a junior computer tech in my last 2 summers of high school. It was here that I discovered what I was passionate about and what I wanted to do. I enrolled in college to get my degree in computer sciences, and I have been working around technology ever since. Here is an opportunity for you to showcase a wide variety of things you may have done both personally and professionally that will get your potential employers interested. Be sure to think about this one in advance in the event that it comes up.

Keep in mind, one of the key things that employers look for is an applicant who is self motivated and goal oriented.

Again, this shows your employer you are the go-getter they are looking for. In the end, you want to ensure that you are leaving your interviewer with the impression that you are motivated, self sufficient, and manage your time effectively. Answer samples That is a really great question. This has taught me a great deal about community, teamwork, and taking initiative.

I took it upon myself to enroll in a summer business admin course at the local community college. Through this, I picked up some really great knowledge on communication and teamwork, as well as further develop overall managerial skills. Though it may not be directly applicable to this particular job, I believe the overall experience I gained could be a real asset here.

Your interviewer will use this as an icebreaker, ideally to put you at ease and get you speaking openly and honestly. The person giving the interview has a job to do as well — respect their time. Unless you are asked about something specific, focus on your education, your work history, relatable hobbies and outside interests, as well as your current situation. Be sure to start chronologically and tell a linear story. Start where you feel is sensical, then work your way up to the present.

Why should we hire you? On the one hand, you have an opportunity to really stand out from the pack. Is there a wrong way to answer this question? Consider the responses below: All of these answers demonstrate a benefit to you.

While every employer assumes that these sorts of things play in on some level, these are not the reasons they are going to hire you. In summation, clearly illustrate what in specific has made you a good employee, and how you envision yourself contributing to and benefiting the company.

This can be a great way to stand out from other applicants and demonstrate initiative. Almost every company will have a website, Facebook page, Instagram account, or some sort of digital footprint. Spend a bit of time doing some online research: Who are some of the principal people who work there? Who are the founders? What sorts of things does this company care about? Do they donate to a particular cause or charity? What are their core values? Which of their core values resonate with you?

Has the company been in the news recently or have they won any awards Social Media can be a great place to find this information. But a question that if answered improperly, can be a deal breaker. After all, are you not likely to leave this particular job if you found you could make more down the street?

If your current employer is downsizing, be honest about it, remain positive, but keep it brief.

Interview questions. A free inside look at Department Manager interview questions and process details for companies - all posted anonymously by interview candidates. In this article, we explore some of the most common interview questions asked during a retail department manager interview along with some great answers to help you win the job. The assistant manager will then ask you questions about the department as well as generic retail based questions and questions about your experience. Interview Questions There were a few questions about managing employees that would you be underneath you, so, supervisory like questions.